Published on
Thursday, May 5th, 2022

What did a team of four students learn when they spent several days (and nights) on the streets of Dallas? Their goal was to hear from people experiencing homelessness and get a small taste of that Homelessness directly affects about 580,000 Americans, but most of us don’t encounter these individuals face to face. Our guests in this episode temporarily surrendered their comfort and ease to live among those who have been less fortunate.

View the project website.

Here is the testimony they mentioned from their emergency contact.

Published on
Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

What is the importance of hospitality for Christians? How can one show a spirit of hospitality beyond just inviting others into their house? Bryant Martin, owner of Sowers Harvest Café, shares about the example of hospitality that Jesus left for his disciples. Bryant quotes Mark Glanville saying, “We learn from Jesus fellowship meals that our tables should be places of radical welcome, especially for those who feel lonely and on the outside. This is the shape of the Kingdom of God!” The next episode we will release will be part two of this interview.

Published on
Monday, February 24th, 2020

This episode is part two of an interview with Bryant Martin about hospitality. Here Bryant moves from describing the importance of hospitality to telling personal stories about how he has seen being hospitable work out. Bryant finishes the interview by quoting Rosaria Butterfield, “Radical, ordinary, and daily hospitality is a basic building block for vital Christian living. Start anywhere but do start.”

Authored By

  • Henry Moody
Published On
Thursday, June 14th, 2018

Written by Henry Moody

Across the sparrows and slates of the rooftops of London, the Dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral heard the great bells naming him where he lay in pain and doubt, wrestling with his God. High over the town, the swinging mouth and heavy iron tongue of the Death Knell measured out his days as the dread voice spoke relentlessly into his soul. It reached out like the finger of the Almighty, plucking him from the world of men, a summons to abandon all comfort and joy, take up his sins and stand alone before the Judge.

The funeral bells rang out often over London in 1623 as the Great Plague ran amok through the town. Consequently, when the terrible fevers struck, and the discolored lesions bloomed on his skin, John Donne despaired. The literary genius, ladies’ man, and writer of risqué verse turned ordained minister lay nailed to a bed of pain, suffering, he suspected, the torments of the damned in the hands of a jealous God. And so, when the voices of the bells came in at the open window, they could only be calling him.

Shortly afterwards, however, a tragic procession passed by on the street below, and his mistake became clear: the tolling of the bell was for another man. In time his illness, most likely typhus and not the plague, passed and Donne lived. Yet the moment left him deeply changed. What of the dead man so utterly alone, cut off forever from the affairs of the living, from the small joys and sorrows of the day and those deep ties of warmth and fellowship that run through all mankind? Unable for a time to read or talk, Donne let his pen speak for him in some of the most powerful words ever uttered in the English language. “No man,” he wrote, “is an Iland, intire of itselfe…”1

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